Sunday, November 28, 2010

TUCSON CONFERENCE: Combating Hate, Censorship and Forbidden Curricula




DEC 2-4 COMBATING HATE, CENSORSHIP, & FORBIDDEN CURRICULA CONFERENCE
.
Just announced: Civil Rights activist Dolores Huerta will be be speaking Friday at 8 pm
.
There is no charge for this conference. However, donations are greatly needed and appreciated.

PRELIMINARY CONFERENCE SCHEDULE


THURSDAY DEC 2 - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
7:00 –8:am Opening Ceremony-Outside Old Main – CALPOLLI TEOXICALLI
8– 9:45 am Opening Platica CALPOLLI TEOXICALLI- Old Main Auditorium
Chucho Ruiz, Maria Molina, Norma Gonzalez, Jose Gonzalez and Zotero Citlacoatl
An Indigenous Education
10 am TOUR OF EXHIBIT - Main Library
10-10-50am Community Organizing Panel
Cesar Chavez Bldg #205
Corazón de Tucson, Karla Artiño, Guadalupe Ramos
Tucson Childcare Collective
Tierra y Libertad
Yo Soy Testigo
Fred Highton, MoveOn.Org
11-4 pm Sessions at The KIVA-UA Student Union
11-11:50 am - SESSION - The KIVA-UA Student Union
Raza Studies K-12 Dialogue
Ochoa and Van Buskirk Elementary Schools
Moderated by Norma Gonzalez
NOON-12:50 pm - SESSION
LESSONS OF TLATELOLCO (1968) and THE 1970 NATIONAL CHICANO MORATORIUM
Celeste Bustamante, UA-School of Journalism - Tlatelolco in the Curriculum
Ramses Noriega, Co-founder, National Chicano Moratrorium
Ashley Bustamante, Tucson HS student, Ruben Salazar and The Moratorium
Carmen Orozco, Tucson HS student, Ruben Salazar and The Moratorium
1-1:50 pm -SESSION MAS GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
Lizette Opio, Courtney Lower, Adrian Mendoza, Arlene Provencio
Moderator: Rosario Carrillo, PhD, MAS-University of Arizona
2-2:50 pm ANALYSIS OF ANTI-ETHNIC/RAZA STUDIES HB2281-KIVA Student Union
Anna Ochoa O'Leary, Andrea Romero, Randall Amster and Auggie Romero
3-3:50 pm GRADUATE STUDENT SESSION
FREIRE-TUHIWAI SMITH-ACUNA DIALOGUE
Courtney Waters, Erin MacKinney, Cash Conner Yousseff Toure
Moderated by Jose Gonzalez, Raza Studies Teacher, TUSD
OLD MAIN AUDITORIUM (GROUND FLOOR)
3-4:45 pm MECHA-YOUTH CITYWIDE/REGIONAL DIALOGUE

EVENING PROGRAM
YWCA 5-10pm EVE RECEPTION - 525 N. Bonita Ave TUCSON AZ 85745
5:-5:30 pm FOOD/RECEPTION
Opening Alianza Indigena
Nuestra Voz-YWCA Youth Presentation
Sara Gonzales YWCA host
5:45:-6:30 pm EL CORAJE STUDENT/ELDERS PRESENTATION
Student presentation of El Coraje Magazine To Founders of El Coraje Newspaper
Elders: Salomon Baldenegro Sr., Ceci Cruz, Guadalupe Castillo and Frank de la Cruz
Students: Karina Salazar, Lalo Villalobos, Marissa Martinez and Norma Grijalva
6:35- 7:15 pm TUSD-RAZA/ETHNIC STUDIES STUDENTS ALUMNI PANEL
Alfonso Chavez, Pima CC
Pricila Rodriguez, University of Arizona
Jacob Robles Pima CC
Angelica Peñaran Tucson HS
Sarah Navarrette, Pueblo HS
Flor Burruel, Sunnyside HS
DINA BARAJAS - Side by Side by Zitkala
7:25-8 pm TUSD-RAZA/ETHNIC STUDIES EDUCATORS PANEL
Auggie Romero, Sean Arce, Raza Studies educators and plaintiffs
8:05 PM - 8:20 pm Professor and Tucson elder, Raquel Rubio Goldsmith
8:20- 8:30 COURTNEY LOWER
Intro to Rodolfo Acuña
8:30-8:50 pm Rodolfo Acuna, CSUN Prof, author, Occupied America
8:50-9:30 pm RAZA/ETHNIC STUDIES DIALOGUE
Led By Kim Dominguez, Arturo Rodriguez and Jennifer Contreras
9:30-10 pm RECEPTION/MUSIC
FRIDAY DEC 3– UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
8 -9:50 am MAESTROS DE SEMILLA: INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE
Cesar Chavez # 205 and 209 (W Breakfast)
10-10: 45 Arizona's Neo-Apartheid
Manuel Hernandez (ASU)
Russell Pearce: the Death of the 1960s Gains in Civil Rights for Minorities in Arizona
and an Unfolding National Consensus for a Repeat of Operation Wetback
Jennifer James, Phoenix University
10:45-11:45am DECOLONIZING THE UNIVERSITY AS SOCIAL MOVEMENT
Cesar Chavez # 205 and 209
Samuel Bañales (UC Berkeley). "Challenging the Coloniality of Organizing with Activism
from Below"
Mattie Harper (UC Berkeley). "We Are Still Here: Confronting Myths of the Vanishing Indian Within the
Western Academy"
Nelson Maldonado-Torres (Rutgers University). "Next Steps: A Latina/o Academy of Arts and Sciences."
nmt@berkeley.edu
Moderator: Damian Baca, University of Arizona
11am–NOON BOOK READINGS
Rosalia Solorzano and Francisca J. Hernandez – Chicana Studies Reader
Moderator: Bob Diaz
UA - Main Library #A313
NOON-1pm MALL FOOD AND ENTERTAINMENT
Raza Studies K-12 Dialogue
1- 1:30 pm EXHIBIT MAIN LIBRARY
2 - 4:30 pm ACADEMIC PRESENTATIONS – GALLAGHER THEATER
2 - 2:50 pm HISTORICAL TRAUMA
Moderated and presentation by Teresa Carrillo, Phd, Director, Raza Studies, San Francisco State University - The Latino Threat Narrative
Lydia Zulema Martinez Vega and Luname Teoxihuitl Harrishawk
Tommy Begay UA, Historical Trauma
2:55 - 3:35 pm BEYOND ARIZONA
Carlos Montes – Los Angeles, Community Service Organization (CSO), Fight Back News, & S. Calif. Immigration Coalition
Nora Salas, Phd Candidate, Michigan State University
Todd Mireles - Phd Candidate, Michigan State University
Sara Provenzale: The Media and HB 2281
3:40-4:30 pm IN DEFENSE OF RAZA STUDIES: A SCIENCE OF THE PEOPLE
Pablo Aceves: Community Counselor, member of the Comite de Derechos Humanos Digna Ochoa (San Diego), and the Raza Press and Media Association (RPMA)
Ernesto Bustillos: Teacher, Member of the Raza Press and Media Association and the Association of Raza Educators (A.R.E.)-San Diego.
Cathy Espitia: Member of the Comite de Mujeres, Patricia Marin, coordinator of the Chicano Mexicano Prison Project (San Diego).
Francisco Romero, teacher and member of the Raza Rights Committee, Oxnard, Califaztlan
4:30 -5pm MEAL BREAK

EVENING PROGRAM GALLAGHER THEATER - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
5:15-6 pm ALIANZA INDIGENA SIN FRONTERAS, O'ODHAM SOLIDARITY ACROSS BORDERS COLLECTIVE
6-:6:50 pm REPORT FROM PHOENIX – BATTLE OVER SB 1070
Salvador Reza, Carlos Garcia,Tupac Enrique Acosta, Shannon Rivers
7-7:50 pm DIALOGUE: ARIZONA HATE and HOMOPHOBIA
Cherrie Moraga, Celia Rodriguez Raúl Al-qaraz Ochoa
Moderator: Sandy Soto
8:00-9:30 pm DIALOGUE: THE STATE OF ARIZONA
Simon Ortiz, Isabel Garcia, James Anaya,
Moderator: Leilani Clark
Opening Poem: Mixelle Rascon
9:30 pm SAFOS THEATER

SATURDAY DEC 3
7 am Run from A MOUNTAIN to El Rio Community Center
Contact: Calpolli Teoxicalli - Teoxicalli@yahoo.com
El Rio CC - 1390 West Speedway Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85745-2324
10 am-11:30am PLATICA CALPOLLI TEOXICALLI
AMPHITHEATER EL RIO CC
Noon -7pm FLORICANTO ARTS/MUSIC FESTIVAL
2 stages
Indoor and Outdoor stage
LESLIE MARMON SILKO – CHERRIE MORAGA - LUCI TAPAHONSO – FRANCISCO ALARCON - ELENA DIAZ BJORKQUIST – MARIA RAMIREZ – LUKE SALCIDO - CIHUATL CE - NICO-POETS DEL NORTE - FELICIA FE MONTES – MIXPE- STELLA POPE DUARTE – ANDREA HOLM – RAUL ALCARAZ - HEDY TREVINO – ELIAS SERNA – ALEX SOTO – TOLTEKA - TEATRO IZKALLI – SARAH GONZALEZ – NUESTRA VOZ –YWCA - ZARCO – DULCE JUAREZ – SAFOS THEATER – MARGE PELLEGRINO – MIXELLE RASCON – MI’JAN MI’JAN CELIE – SONIA GUTIERREZ - PHOTOGRAPHERS: LAYLA MARIE HERNANDEZ, FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZ – ANITA FERNANDEZ – CELESTINO FERNANDEZ – KEVAN CHUC - JOEL 'RAGE.ONE' GARCIA - EL VUH
(PARTIAL LIST)
INDOOR STAGE– poets/musicians/ and several arts/research presentations
MC/Coordinator Andrea Holm: ahholm@email.arizona.edu
The times below represent approximations.
KEVAN CHUC
Auto de Fe 1562 RESEARCH PLUS IMPROV THEATER
12:00-12:30pm
JUDITH SALCIDO – the music of SANTANA
12:30-12:45 pm
ANITA FERNANDEZ: Prescott Mural Controversy:
12:45-1pm
CELESTINO FERNANDEZ: Sb 1070 Corridos and Multi Media Presentation
1-1:30
ZARCO (MASCARAS TEATRO)
1:30-1:50 pm
MARGE PELLEGRINO - Poet
1:50-2pm
CHERRIE MORAGA – essayist/writer
2-2:25 MINUTES
LESLIE MARMON SILKO - Poet
2:30-2:55pm
FRANCISCO ALARCON
3pm-3:20pm
LUCI TAPAHONSO - Poet
3:20-3:30pm
STELLA POPE DUARTE - Poet
3:30-3:50pm
HEDY TREVINO - Poet:
3:50-4pm
ELIAS SERNA: Research presentation/performance
4-4:30pm
MI’JAN MI’JAN CELIE: (415-425-6446) mijancelie@gmail.com
Documentary
4:30-5pm
FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZ: Photographer – Documention of Progressive Movements
5-5:20
SAFOS THEATER
5:20-5:30
SONIA GUTIERREZ – writer/poet
5:30-5:45
ELENA DIAZ BJORKQUIST - Poet
5:45-5:55
RAUL ALCARAZ – poetry-spoken word
6-6:10pm
RAGING GRANNIES - songs
6:10-6:20
ANDREA HOLM - poetry
6:20-6:30
TEATRO IZKALLI –Theater
6:30—7:15 MINUTES
CLOSING
OUTDOOR STAGE
Coordinated/MC by: Westli Narro: wesley_1310@hotmail.com
REVERSE ORDER (Preliminary schedule)
6:30 - 7:00 (30mins) Tolteka & Marlene
6:25 - 6:30 (5mins)
6:25 - 6:05 (20mins) Cihualt Ce
6:05 – 6:00 (5mins)
6:00 – 5:40 (20mins) Los Poets del Norte
5:40 – 5:35 (5mins)
5:35 – 5:15 (20mins) Felicia
5:15 – 5:10 (5mins)
5:10 – 4:50 (20mins) Las Ramonas
4:50 – 4:45 (5mins)
3:15 – 4:45 DJ Alias/Shining Soul/Cozmo Brown
3:10 – 3:15 (5mins)
2:55 - 3:10 (15mins) Luke Salcido
2:50 – 2:55 (5mins)
2:30 – 2:50 (20mins) Tupak
2:25 – 2:30 (5mins)
2:00 – 2:25 (25mins) El Vuh
1:55 – 2:00 (5mins)
1:30 – 1:55 (25mins) Cui Cui
1:00pm Set up

Forgotten People Lawsuit: Navajo Nation Twin Arrows Casino


NOTICE OF SUIT
Navajo Nation Sovereign Immunity Act

NOTICE OF EQUITABLE ACTION AGAINST
NAVAJO NATION AND ITS OFFICIALS,
THE NAVAJO-HOPI LAND COMMISSION,
NAVAJO-HOPI LAND COMMISSION OFFICE AND
ITS STAFF ASSISTANT,
THE CONTROLLER OF THE NAVAJO NATION,
and
OTHER UNKNOWN ENTITIES AND INDIVIDUALS.

TO: The President of the Navajo Nation
The Attorney General of the Navajo Nation

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, pursuant to 1 N.N.C. § 555(A) (2005), that The Forgotten People and Don Yellowman, on behalf of themselves and a class consisting of the beneficiaries of the Navajo Rehabilitation Trust Fund, desire to institute suit against the Navajo Nation or its officers, employees or agents, and the prospective plaintiffs give notice that amends its prior notice dated October 22, 2010, retroactive to such date, follows:

Prospective Plaintiffs

The prospective parties include all those impacted by the proposed Twin Arrows Casino or who are denied the benefit of the income and investment from it, as previously stated.

Prospective Defendants

The prospective defendants are the same as in the prior notice.

Nature of Claims

The August 25, 2010 special warranty deed to the “Navajo Nation of Indians (the ‘Navajo Nation’)” created a covenant that runs with the land, deed restriction, or other special condition, that “the Twin Arrows Parcel shall be used solely for the benefit of Navajo families ... awaiting relocation....” That is a specific trust in their favor.

The claim stated in the prior notice is restated here, that there is an equitable resulting trust in favor of Navajos for whom the lands were set aside. They are the victims of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute, beneficiaries of legislation for their benefit, and the refugees or survivors of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute and the Bennett Freeze. Their situation, and the purposes of the tract of land, create a resulting trust in their favor.

There is also a social trust on that tract of land that arises from the aboriginal rights of the refugee-survivors of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute, their suffering, their neglect by governments (including their own Navajo Nation government), and arises from a natural law social mortgage.

Given the current political situation of the Navajo Nation and past financing issues with casinos the prospective plaintiffs will also examine fiduciary issues regarding Twin Arrows and compliance with financial statutes and controls, and assert claims as needed.

Relief to be Sought

The prospective plaintiffs seek the relief previously stated, without any limitation on potential relief.

Plaintiffs’ Attorney

The prospective plaintiffs’ attorney is as previously stated and other potential attorneys.

Dated this 24th day of November, 2010

THE FORGOTTEN PEOPLE AND OTHERS



By____________________________________________
Don Yellowman, President of the Forgotten People
P.O. Box 1661
Tuba City, Navajo Nation
(Arizona) 86045

Tel: (928) 401-1777
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SUPERIOR COURT OF ARIZONA
COUNTY OF COCONINO

THE NAVAJO NATION,

Petitioner, No. CV 2010-00997

v.

THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA,
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COCONINO and

DON YELLOWMAN,

Respondents.

AFFIDAVIT IN RETURN TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE


DON YELLOWMAN, the named real party in interest, makes this affidavit to appear and makes return to the order to show cause directed against him, without appearing for the purposes of jurisdiction, to contest the jurisdiction of this honorable court over him and over the cause of action, and to contest the merits, and he states as follows:

STATE OF ARIZONA :
: ss.
County of Coconino :

1. I am an enrolled member of the Navajo Tribe of Indians or Navajo Nation, and at all times relevant to this action I resided at Tuba City, within the Navajo Nation.
2. The facts and matters in the lis pendens that the petitioner claims are solely an internal matter involving members of the Navajo Tribe of Indians or Navajo Nation and their government that involve claims of impropriety by an entity of the Navajo Nation in the operation of a proposed Casino located on what is now federal Indian trust land.
3. This court does not have jurisdiction over matters affecting tribal members and their Indian tribes under the Constitution of the United States and disclaimers of jurisdiction by the State of Arizona.
4. The lis pendens in this case asserts facts and matters arising from litigation in the Navajo Nation and this court does not have jurisdiction to second-guess the Navajo Nation judicial system on the nature of matters pending before it.
5. The lis pendens notifies the public of pending and prospective litigation and the same is proper under § 12-1191, A.R.S. as “notice of the pendency of ... action or defense.”
6. I am the chief officer of an unincorporated association of Navajos called “The Forgotten People,” an organization that advocates for the survivors of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute.
7. It is a public interest organization and I have exercised my rights of freedom of association and free speech in asserting what I believe are valid claims on behalf of fellow Navajos, my grassroots organization and myself.
8. Such claims are stated in the lis pendens, in terms of not only claims asserted in litigation pending in the Courts of the Navajo Nation over facts and matters within its exclusive jurisdiction but in terms of a resulting trust on casino assets and proceeds in favor of Navajos, and specifically Navajos awaiting relocation (as stated in the Navajo Nation’s deed).
9. Our October 22, 2010 notice of claim against the Navajo Nation gives it notice that the lis pendens involves the Navajo Rehabilitation Trust Fund and a resulting trust.
10. I have given subsequent notice, for The Forgotten People, of additional claims against the Navajo Nation under federal legislation for the benefit of Navajos impacted by the Navajo-Hopi land dispute, an equitable resulting trust on casino land and assets, and a social trust on the land that arises from the aboriginal rights of Navajos who survived the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute.
11. We are awaiting the expiry of statutory deadlines before filing suit on both claims.
12. The lis pendens is not a misstatement or false claim under the provisions of § 33-420(A), A.R.S., and in any event, this court does not have jurisdiction to assess the merits or not of the claim because it is one between a tribe and its members and one subject only to the jurisdiction of the Navajo Nation.
13. I was served with process in this matter by a Navajo Nation private process server at the home of my parents in Tuba City, Navajo Nation.
14. I am a Navajo Indian, and I cannot be served with Arizona State process within my Indian reservation, Navajo Indian Country. See State v. Zaman, 946 P.2d 459 (1997) (collecting cases that show that Indians cannot be served with Arizona process in Indian Country).
15. The Navajo Nation Council enacted legislation, codified at 7 N.N.C.§ 253a(I) (2005), that prohibits the service of State process in the Navajo Nation without approval by a Navajo Nation court.
16. A Navajo Nation court cannot order the service of process where the foreign tribunal does not have jurisdiction or the service of such process violates Navajo Nation public policy. 7 N.N.C. § 253a(I)(4) (2005).
17. The question of such service is solely a matter within the jurisdiction of the Navajo Nation judicial system.
18. There is no proof that a Navajo Nation court approved service in this case, and in any event, the court could not approve service of process where this court lacks jurisdiction.
19. The affiant must be given an opportunity to attack an illegal court order if such approval was given.
20. The statute that prohibits service of process was enacted pursuant to provisions of the Navajo Nation-United States Treaty of 1868 and that is why the statute binds this court.
21. The Attorney General of the Navajo Nation is the sole legal officer of the Navajo Nation, and the purported counsel for the petitioner Nation has not produced proof of its authority under Navajo Nation law.
22. The court should dismiss this action because it lacks jurisdiction, because there are no violations of Arizona lis pendens statutes, and because the lis pendens is protected by the fundamental rights of freedom of association, free speech, and the rights of American Indians under the Constitutions of the United States and the State of Arizona.
23. I reserve the right to claim damages against the Navajo Nation for wrongfully bringing this action and to offset any illegal damages that may be granted by this court, in the Courts of the Navajo Nation.
24. I made this affidavit before an Arizona State notary because Navajo Nation law does not provide for notaries or other private persons who can administer oaths.


______________________________________________________
Don Yellowman

SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me, a Notary Public for the State of Arizona, on this _____ day of November, 2010.



______________________________________________________
Notary Public for the State of Arizona
Residing at:
My commission expires:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SUPERIOR COURT OF ARIZONA
COUNTY OF COCONINO

THE NAVAJO NATION,

Petitioner, No. CV 2010-00997

v.

THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA,
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COCONINO and

DON YELLOWMAN,

Respondents.

AFFIDAVIT IN RETURN TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE


DON YELLOWMAN, the named real party in interest, makes this affidavit to appear and makes return to the order to show cause directed against him, without appearing for the purposes of jurisdiction, to contest the jurisdiction of this honorable court over him and over the cause of action, and to contest the merits, and he states as follows:

STATE OF ARIZONA :
: ss.
County of Coconino :

1. I am an enrolled member of the Navajo Tribe of Indians or Navajo Nation, and at all times relevant to this action I resided at Tuba City, within the Navajo Nation.
2. The facts and matters in the lis pendens that the petitioner claims are solely an internal matter involving members of the Navajo Tribe of Indians or Navajo Nation and their government that involve claims of impropriety by an entity of the Navajo Nation in the operation of a proposed Casino located on what is now federal Indian trust land.
3. This court does not have jurisdiction over matters affecting tribal members and their Indian tribes under the Constitution of the United States and disclaimers of jurisdiction by the State of Arizona.
4. The lis pendens in this case asserts facts and matters arising from litigation in the Navajo Nation and this court does not have jurisdiction to second-guess the Navajo Nation judicial system on the nature of matters pending before it.
5. The lis pendens notifies the public of pending and prospective litigation and the same is proper under § 12-1191, A.R.S. as “notice of the pendency of ... action or defense.”
6. I am the chief officer of an unincorporated association of Navajos called “The Forgotten People,” an organization that advocates for the survivors of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute.
7. It is a public interest organization and I have exercised my rights of freedom of association and free speech in asserting what I believe are valid claims on behalf of fellow Navajos, my grassroots organization and myself.
8. Such claims are stated in the lis pendens, in terms of not only claims asserted in litigation pending in the Courts of the Navajo Nation over facts and matters within its exclusive jurisdiction but in terms of a resulting trust on casino assets and proceeds in favor of Navajos, and specifically Navajos awaiting relocation (as stated in the Navajo Nation’s deed).
9. Our October 22, 2010 notice of claim against the Navajo Nation gives it notice that the lis pendens involves the Navajo Rehabilitation Trust Fund and a resulting trust.
10. I have given subsequent notice, for The Forgotten People, of additional claims against the Navajo Nation under federal legislation for the benefit of Navajos impacted by the Navajo-Hopi land dispute, an equitable resulting trust on casino land and assets, and a social trust on the land that arises from the aboriginal rights of Navajos who survived the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute.
11. We are awaiting the expiry of statutory deadlines before filing suit on both claims.
12. The lis pendens is not a misstatement or false claim under the provisions of § 33-420(A), A.R.S., and in any event, this court does not have jurisdiction to assess the merits or not of the claim because it is one between a tribe and its members and one subject only to the jurisdiction of the Navajo Nation.
13. I was served with process in this matter by a Navajo Nation private process server at the home of my parents in Tuba City, Navajo Nation.
14. I am a Navajo Indian, and I cannot be served with Arizona State process within my Indian reservation, Navajo Indian Country. See State v. Zaman, 946 P.2d 459 (1997) (collecting cases that show that Indians cannot be served with Arizona process in Indian Country).
15. The Navajo Nation Council enacted legislation, codified at 7 N.N.C.§ 253a(I) (2005), that prohibits the service of State process in the Navajo Nation without approval by a Navajo Nation court.
16. A Navajo Nation court cannot order the service of process where the foreign tribunal does not have jurisdiction or the service of such process violates Navajo Nation public policy. 7 N.N.C. § 253a(I)(4) (2005).
17. The question of such service is solely a matter within the jurisdiction of the Navajo Nation judicial system.
18. There is no proof that a Navajo Nation court approved service in this case, and in any event, the court could not approve service of process where this court lacks jurisdiction.
19. The affiant must be given an opportunity to attack an illegal court order if such approval was given.
20. The statute that prohibits service of process was enacted pursuant to provisions of the Navajo Nation-United States Treaty of 1868 and that is why the statute binds this court.
21. The Attorney General of the Navajo Nation is the sole legal officer of the Navajo Nation, and the purported counsel for the petitioner Nation has not produced proof of its authority under Navajo Nation law.
22. The court should dismiss this action because it lacks jurisdiction, because there are no violations of Arizona lis pendens statutes, and because the lis pendens is protected by the fundamental rights of freedom of association, free speech, and the rights of American Indians under the Constitutions of the United States and the State of Arizona.
23. I reserve the right to claim damages against the Navajo Nation for wrongfully bringing this action and to offset any illegal damages that may be granted by this court, in the Courts of the Navajo Nation.
24. I made this affidavit before an Arizona State notary because Navajo Nation law does not provide for notaries or other private persons who can administer oaths.


______________________________________________________
Don Yellowman

SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me, a Notary Public for the State of Arizona, on this _____ day of November, 2010.



______________________________________________________
Notary Public for the State of Arizona
Residing at:
My commission expires:

Friday, November 26, 2010

Leonard Peltier: The Day of Mourning



Thursday, November 25, 2010


The Day of Mourning:

Peltier Statement,
25 Nov 2010


Greetings, my relatives.

It seems another year has gone by since the last time we gathered like this. I say we, although I am not there with you in body, my spirit certainly is. We have coined this day, a day of mourning, as opposed to a day of thanksgiving. It’s a shame that for the most part thanksgiving is relegated to only one day. And mourning is something that relates to unhappy circumstances that have taken place. We certainly can’t change what has happened. This very day is ours and tomorrow hasn’t happened yet and, is uncertain. I really don’t like to dwell on the mourning aspects of life but instead, on what we can do to prevent those unhappy and sometimes terrible times in our history. I may have mentioned it once before but I once read about a union organizer named Joe Hill that was framed by the copper mine owners to be executed. And I believe he said what really needs to be said upon his death. His words were “don’t mourn, organize”. And those are also my sentiments.

There are a lot of things that happened in the past that can be prevented in the future. There are losses that can be regained. But we must organize to do it. We must find it within ourselves to be in touch with the Creator for I can tell you from a heartfelt fact that when they’ve pushed you away, into a dark corner, not just your body, but your mind, your soul, your spirit, there is no one that can sustain you but the Creator himself. Dark moments come and go in all our lifetimes. And there are those in political office, who will try to turn your head away from the obvious truths. They will lie to you about what they believe. They will try to get you to follow what they consider politically correct while ignoring the truth, such as protests against the Mosque being built within blocks of the fallen Trade towers, which incidentally was a monument to wealth and wealth seekers. I am not trying to demean the innocent people whose only cause of their death was seeking a place of employment to feed their families. While they protest the Mosque, no one mentions the Native American sacred places that by treaty are seriously violated daily. Our Sacred Black Hills of South Dakota, sacred to many tribes, have the faces of many of our oppressors carved on them. The place of vision seeking, Bear Butte in South Dakota, sacred to us for millennia, has a bar built at the foot of it and there is talk of having helicopter flights around it to attract tourism. And, there is even talk of drilling for oil and gas.

Every time I have to write or I should say dictate, one of these statements, I try to think of what I would say if this was the last time I got to speak. The thing that comes to mind in some of our sacred ceremonies and that is thoughts of our relationships with the ones we love and the Creator of all life. Not to take away from the theme of this day, but if you can hold the person you love, be thankful. If you can walk on green grass, touch a tree, be thankful. If you can breathe air that didn’t come through a ventilation system, or a window with bars, be thankful. If you can stand in an open field or some other place at night and look up at the heavens, be thankful. No one appreciates the simple things as much as a man or woman locked away. I know sometimes some of my friends may have thought I had become institutionalized and there may be some element of my thinking behavior that has become calloused from this continued imprisonment. But I have not for a moment forgotten the needs of my people and the atrocities committed against them or the circumstances that all the poor and impoverished face in this world at the hands of those who take more than they need and exploit for gain, the futures of our children. I paint pictures of them sometimes, people I’ve known, people I’ve met, places I’ve seen, and places I’ve only seen in my minds eye. And if my paintbrush was magical, rest assured I would paint for myself one open door.

I wrestle with what to say to you and words are sometimes so inadequate. So if you are free today, un-imprisoned, be thankful. Give the person next to you a hug for me. May the Great Spirit bless you always in all ways with the things you need. May you find joy in doing what is right and righting what is wrong and seek to be the best example of what a human should be in our lifetime.

In the Spirit of those we mourn, those who gave their lives and those whose lives were taken from them.

I really don’t know what else to say because in writing this, my heart has become heavy with the emotions of this time.

In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, who gave his life for what was right and tried to right what was wrong.

Your Brother,
Leonard Peltier

VICAM PUEBLO: En Defensa del Agua


CONGRESO NACIONAL INDÍGENA


PRONUNCIAMIENTO DE VÍCAM
EN DEFENSA DEL AGUA, LA TIERRA Y LA AUTONOMÍA DE LOS PUEBLOS ORIGINARIOS

REUNIDOS EN LA CASA DEL YAQUI LOS PUEBLOS, TRIBUS Y NACIONES PURÉPECHA, NAHUA, WIXÁRIKA, COCA, ODHAM, YAQUI, MAYO-YOREME, MIXTECO, TRIQUI, TZOTZIL Y OTOMÍ, JUNTO CON INTEGRANTES DE LA SOCIEDAD CIVIL MEXICANA Y DE DIVERSOS PAÍSES DE AMÉRICA, ASIA Y EUROPA PARA CELEBRAR EL PRIMER FORO NACIONAL E INTERNACIONAL EN DEFENSA DEL AGUA, Y RECONOCIENDO QUE:


1. EL AGUA, NUESTRA MADRE Y NUESTRO PADRE, ES EL FUNDAMENTO, JUNTO CON LA TIERRA, EL CALOR Y EL AIRE, DE NUESTRAS VIDAS Y DE LA EXISTENCIA DE TODO LO QUE SE NACE Y LO QUE SE VIVE; Y POR LO TANTO NO ES UNA COSA QUE SE PUEDA COMPRAR Y VENDER COMO LO PRETENDE EL BRUTAL CAPITALISMO QUE ASESINA A LA MADRE TIERRA;

2 LA TIERRA, EL AGUA Y TODO LO QUE EN ELLAS SE NACE INTEGRAN LOS TERRITORIOS INMEMORIALES DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS, SIENDO INSEPARABLES ENTRE SÍ, AÚN CUANDO EL NEOLIBERALISMO, EN SU AFÁN DE GANANCIAS, BUSCA ROMPER LA TIERRA PARA FACILITAR LA APROPIACIÓN PRIVADA DE CADA UNO DE SUS ELEMENTOS CONVIRTIÉNDOLOS EN SIMPLES MERCANCÍAS;

3. LAS GRANDES EMPRESAS NACIONALES Y EXTRANJERAS, CON EL CONCURSO DEL ESTADO MEXICANO, BUSCAN LA APROPIACIÓN DE LOS TERRITORIOS DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS Y DE LOS BIENES DE LA NACIÓN, GENERANDO LEYES, POLÍTICAS Y ACCIONES PARA LA PRIVATIZACIÓN CAPITALISTA DE LAS AGUAS, RÍOS, PLAYAS, MARES, LAGUNAS, MANANTIALES, TIERRAS, BOSQUES, MINERALES, PLANTAS Y SABERES TRADICIONALES.

4. EN EL ENCUENTRO DE PUEBLOS INDÍGENAS DE AMÉRICA, REALIZADO LOS DÍAS 11, 12, 13 Y 14 DE OCTUBRE DE 2007 EN ESTE TERRITORIO DE LA TRIBU YAQUI, ACORDAMOS RECHAZAR LA GUERRA DE CONQUISTA Y EXTERMINIO CAPITALISTA IMPUESTA POR LAS EMPRESAS TRASNACIONALES Y LOS ORGANISMOS FINANCIEROS INTERNACIONALES EN COMPLICIDAD CON LAS GRANDES POTENCIAS Y LOS ESTADOS NACIONALES.
ASIMISMO ACORDAMOS RECHAZAR LA DESTRUCCIÓN Y EL SAQUEO DE LA MADRE TIERRA A TRAVÉS DE LA OCUPACIÓN DE NUESTROS TERRITORIOS PARA LA REALIZACIÓN DE ACTIVIDADES INDUSTRIALES, MINERAS, AGROEMPRESARIALES, TURÍSTICAS, DE URBANIZACIÓN SALVAJE E INFRAESTRUCTURA, ASÍ COMO LA PRIVATIZACIÓN DEL AGUA, LA TIERRA, LOS BOSQUES, LOS MARES Y LAS COSTAS, LA DIVERSIDAD BIOLÓGICA, EL AIRE, LA LLUVIA, LOS SABERES TRADICIONALES Y TODO AQUELLO QUE SE NACE EN LA MADRE TIERRA, OPONIÉNDONOS A LA CERTIFICACIÓN DE LAS TIERRAS, COSTAS, AGUAS, SEMILLAS, PLANTAS, ANIMALES Y SABERES TRADICIONALES DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS CON EL PROPÓSITO DE PRIVATIZARLOS.

HACEMOS EL SIGUIENTE PRONUNCIAMIENTO:

PRIMERO.- NOS OPONEMOS A LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DEL ACUEDUCTO DE LA PRESA DEL NOVILLO POR PARTE DEL GOBIERNO FEDERAL, EL GOBIERNO DEL ESTADO Y EL EMPRESARIO CARLOS SLIM, MISMO QUE PRETENDE LLEVAR CASI LA TOTALIDAD DE LAS AGUAS DEL RÍO YAQUI AL MUNICIPIO DE HERMOSILLO PARA FAVORECER LOS INTERESES INMOBILIARIOS, TURÍSTICOS Y AGROINDUSTRIALES DEL GRAN CAPITAL; TODA VEZ QUE LA EJECUCIÓN DE DICHO PROYECTO DESPOJARÁ DE SUS AGUAS, SIN CONSULTA PREVIA, A LA TRIBU YAQUI, ANULANDO SU AUTONOMÍA Y SU DERECHO HISTÓRICO SOBRE LA CUENCA DEL RÍO YAQUI, PROVOCANDO LA DESTRUCCIÓN DE SU TERRITORIO Y EL EXTERMINIO DEFINITIVO DE LA TRIBU, ASÍ COMO LA AFECTACIÓN PROFUNDA DEL EQUILIBRIO ECOLÓGICO EN EL SUR DE SONORA Y LA RUINA DE LOS AGRICULTORES DEL VALLE DEL YAQUI.

SEGUNDO.- RECHAZAMOS EL DESPOJO Y LA APROPIACIÓN PRIVADA DEL AGUA, LOS RÍOS, AROYOS, MANANTIALES, AGUAS PROFUNDAS, ESCURRIDEROS, LAGUNAS, ESTEROS, COSTAS, MARES, PLAYAS Y DE TODO LO QUE INTEGRA LOS TERRITORIOS DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS, ASÍ COMO LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DE ACUEDUCTOS Y REPRESAS PARA EL ACAPARAMIENTO DEL AGUA Y SU USO COMERCIAL. NOS OPONEMOS ROTUNDAMENTE A QUE EL AGUA, FUNDAMENTO DE LA VIDA, PUEDA SER ACAPARADA POR INTERESES PRIVADOS Y QUE SEA CONSIDERADA COMO UNA MERCANCIA SUSCEPTIBLE DE VENTA Y COMPRA. ASIMISMO NOS OPONEMOS A LA LEYES, REGLAMENTOS Y POLÍTICAS GUBERNAMENTALES TENDIENTES A LA PRIVATIZACIÓN DEL AGUA.

TERCERO.- MANIFESTAMOS NUESTRO DERECHO HISTÓRICO A LA LIBRE DETERMINACIÓN COMO PUEBLOS, NACIONES Y TRIBUS ORIGINARIOS, RESPETANDO LAS DIFERENTES FORMAS QUE PARA EL EJERCICIO DE ESTA DECIDAN NUESTROS PUEBLOS, SEGÚN SU ORIGEN, HISTORIA Y ASPIRACIONES.

CUARTO.- DE FRENTE AL CENTENARIO DE LA REVOLUCIÓN MEXICANA DECIMOS QUE ESTA LUCHA HISTÓRICA, ASÍ COMO LAS ANTERIORES GESTAS, COSTARON MUCHA SANGRE A NUESTROS PUEBLOS Y POCO O NADA OBTUVIMOS A CAMBIO DEL SACRIFICIO QUE HICIERON NUESTROS MÁS VIEJOS ABUELOS PARA CONSTRUIR Y LIBERAR LA PATRIA DE TODOS LOS MEXICANOS, PUES LAS SUCESIVAS CONSTITUCIONES DE 1824, 1857 Y 1917 NI TAN SIQUIERA RECONOCEN NUESTRA EXISTENCIA.

QUINTO.- LLAMAMOS A FORTALECER LA AUTONOMÍA DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS DEFENDIENDO LA TIERRA, EL TERRITORIO, LOS MONTES, LAS AGUAS, LOS SERES ESPIRITUALES Y NATURALES, ASÍ COMO LA CULTURA PROPIAS Y FORTALECIENDO NUESTROS GOBIERNOS, NUESTRAS ASAMBLEAS Y NUESTRAS AUTORIDADES TRADICIONALES Y AGRARIAS BAJO EL PRINCIPIO DE MANDAR OBEDECIENDO.

SEXTO.- RECHAZAMOS LA REPRESIÓN GUBERNAMENTAL Y PARAMILITAR DESATADA EN CONTRA DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS Y ESPECIFICAMENTE EN CONTRA DEL PUEBLO TRIQUI DE OAXACA, LAS COMUNIDADES, CARACOLES Y JUNTAS DE BUEN GOBIERNO ZAPATISTAS DE CHIAPAS, LA COMUNIDAD NAHUA DE SANTA MARÍA OSTULA, MICHOACÁN, Y LA COMUNIDAD TZOTZIL DE MITZITÓN, CHIAPAS; ASIMISMO NOS OPONEMOS AL DESPLAZAMIENTO FORZADO DE QUIENES INTEGRAN EL MUNICIPIO AUTÓNOMO DE SAN JUAN COPALA Y A LA MILITARIZACIÓN DE LA REGIÓN TRIQUI, EXHORTANDO A LAS MUJERES, HOMBRES, NIÑOS, NIÑAS, ANCIANAS Y ANCIANOS QUE INTEGRAN EL PUEBLO TRIQUI A RECONSTRUIR SU UNIDAD COMO PUEBLO, SIN DISTINGO DE ORGANIZACIONES Y SIN LA INTROMISIÓN DE LOS INTERESES EXTERNOS QUE PROVOCAN LA CONFRONTACIÓN DEL PUEBLO TRIQUI.

SEPTIMO.- EXIGIMOS LA INMEDIATA LIBERACIÓN DE TODOS NUESTROS COMPAÑEROS DE LUCHA QUE HOY EL MAL GOBIERNO MANTIENE DENTRO DE LAS PRISIONES PARA INTENTAR CALLAR SU VOZ.

OCTAVO.- SALUDAMOS LA HEROÍCA LUCHA DE LA COMUNIDAD NAHUA DE SAN SALVADOR ATENCO Y MANIFESTAMOS NUESTRO APOYO IRRESTRICTO A SU RESISTENCIA EN CONTRA DE LOS CONTINUADOS PROYECTO QUE BUSCAN EL DESPOJO DE SU TERRITORIO.

NOVENO.- LLAMAMOS A TODOS LOS PUEBLOS INDÍGENAS A SEGUIR CONSTRUYENDO Y FORTALECIENDO AL CONGRESO NACIONAL INDÍGENA COMO LA CASA DE NUESTROS PUEBLOS.

VÍCAM, TERRITORIO DE LA TRIBU YAQUI, A 21 DE NOVIEMBRE DE 2010.

ATENTAMENTE

PUEBLOS, TRIBUS Y NACIONES PARTICIPANTES EN EL PRIMER FORO NACIONAL E INTERNACIONAL EN DEFENSA DEL AGUA

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Fr. Vitale going to jail again, while torturers remain free


Fr. Vitale has spent his life protesting the nuclear industry, including the nuclear test site on Western Shoshone lands, and torture training at Fort Huachuca. While he goes to jail one more time, the torturers remain free

November 24, 2010 Update from the Nuclear Resister

TWO PROTESTERS IMMEDIATELY BEGIN 6 MONTH PRISON SENTENCES
FOR FT. BENNING PROTEST

28 Arrested During Annual Protest Weekend

Four protesters arrested and charged with federal trespass at Ft. Benning, Georgia on November 20 and 21 were in court on Tuesday, November 23. Arraigned before U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephen Hyles, Nancy Smith and Christopher Spicer pled not guilty. Their trial is set for January 5. Fr. Louis Vitale, OFM and Michael David Omondi pled no contest and were sentenced to the maximum 6 months in jail (no fine). Both men are presently in a Georgia county jail.

Because they may be transferred at any time, cards and letters to David may be sent to his community for forwarding: The Los Angeles Catholic Worker, 632 N. Brittania St., Los Angeles, CA 90033. Louie's mail may be send to the Nuclear Resister for forwarding at P.O. Box 43383, Tucson, AZ 85733. When they reach their final prison assignment, those addresses will be posted at http://www.nukeresister.org/inside-out/.

The four were arrested at the annual protest and vigil to close the U.S. Army's Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC), formerly know as the School of the Americas.

On Saturday, November 20, 24 others were arrested on city and state charges, including unlawful assembly, failure to disperse, and parading without a permit. Some were blockading the road leading into Ft. Benning with a sign that read, "Stop: This is the End of the Road for the SOA". People not intending to risk arrest were among those swept up, including members of the press, protesters walking back to their cars and a Columbus, Georgia resident who came out of a barber shop to take a photo of the protest. There was also at least one undercover police officer arrested with the protesters but not charged, who later testified against the group in court. Legal observers report that four other people believed to be undercover officers were apprehended during the chaotic arrest scene on Saturday, but never brought to jail or charged.

On Sunday, November 21, Columbus Recorder's Court Judge Michael Cielinski found 22 of the 24 who were arrested by the city guilty on all charges. The remaining two were convicted following a bench trial the next day. All were released from jail by Monday, with fines and bonds exceeding $75,000 (which does not include appeals). They still must also answer state charges, and expect to be arraigned in January.

Contributions are still needed to help with fines and court costs. For more information about the Ft. Benning protest, and to contribute to the legal defense fund, visit http://www.soaw.org/.

Navajos: Say 'NO!' to Dirty Four Corners Power Plant


Tim Wagner
Program Director
Resource Media
150 S. 600 E. Suite 2BSalt Lake City, UT 84105
Office: 801-364-1668Mobile: 801-502-5450
www.resource-media.org
November 24, 2010
Contacts: · Mike Eisenfeld, San Juan Citizens Alliance, 505-360-8994, mike@sanjuancitizens.org

· Lori Goodman, Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment, 970-259-0199, kiyaani@frontier.net

EPA Reschedules Pollution Rule for Four Corners Power Plant
Groups: ‘We need to clean up this dirty legacy.’

FARMINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it is extending the current comment period regarding proposed pollution reduction requirements for the Four Corners Power Plant from December 20, 2010 to March 18, 2011.

The Four Corners plant, located near Farmington, New Mexico, is the nation’s largest source of nitrogen oxide pollution, which has degraded visibility and created regional haze in a region once known for clear skies and pristine natural areas. Large sources of nitrogen oxide are also known to cause heart and respiratory diseases.

Local groups who have been working to clean up the coal-burning power plant and advocating for cleaner, more diversified sources of energy said that in spite of the extension, the Environmental Protection Agency needs to implement the most stringent air quality standards possible in order to address the regional haze pollution problem.

"After an almost 50-year legacy of pollution from the Four Corners Power Plant that has resulted in serious health impacts to the public, we believe that it is time to expedite long-term solutions that benefit our health, our economy, reduce regional haze at our treasured national parks and end the legacy of environmental degradation,” said Mike Eisenfeld with the San Juan Citizens Alliance. “The larger goal here is to transition this region to an economy that benefits everyone who lives here."

The EPA-proposed rule requires new pollution reduction technology on all five coal-fired units of the 2,040 megawatt power plant. The rule comes under the agency’s Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) requirement as part of the Clean Air Act’s Regional Haze Rule to improve visibility in adjacent national parks, such as Grand Canyon and Mesa Verde.

In response, Arizona Public Service Company (APS), who owns Units 1, 2, and 3, proposed to the EPA that it would consider shutting down these older units and installing the pollution reduction technology on only Units 4 & 5. In order to do this, APS would need to purchase the shares of Units 4 & 5 owned by Southern California Edison (SCE).

SCE announced earlier this fall that it was divesting its ownership in units 4 & 5 in order to meet California’s new greenhouse gas restrictions.

APS, whose latest proposal must be evaluated by the EPA, claims that shutting down the three older units while updating the two newer units with modern pollution controls would reduce pollution and haze more than by installing the latest technology on all five units. However, APS is proposing to operate those coal burners for another 31 years until 2041.

This plan has disappointed groups who are advocating for more reductions in dirty coal combustion and dramatic increases in renewable energy in the region.

“APS has publicly stated in the not-so-distant-past that coal will play a smaller role in its portfolio while renewables will increase,” said Lori Goodman with Diné CARE. “Right now, as they are considering these major investments, is their opportunity to make that a reality.”

Goodman said that while coal has provided jobs for some of the Navajo Nation, it has never been the economic panacea that it was touted to be. With poverty and unemployment on the Navajo Nation still occurring at record highs, and the fact that the coal will not last forever while at the same time facing increasing regulatory challenges, Goodman said, “… now is the time for us to start moving towards a more diverse, clean energy economy that can provide the kinds of long-term jobs we want and need.”

Monday, November 22, 2010

Zapatistas: Yaqui: In Defense of Water/Al Primer Foro en Defensa del Agua

National Indigenous Congress in Vicam Pueblo, Sonora, Mexico
Click for English document 'In Defense of Water'
English Translation link:

Listen to Ofelia Rivas, O'odham, report on Blogtalk Radio:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/brenda-norrell


TRIBU YAQUI- CONGRESO NACIONAL INDIGENA

C O N V OC A T O R I A

Al Primer Foro en Defensa del Agua.

Considerando que el territorio desde tiempos inmemoriales es el lugar donde nosotros los pueblos indígenas, naciones y tribus, nos nacimos de nuestra madre tierra, y vivimos como hermanos con las plantas, flores y árboles, con los animales, aves e insectos, de los aires, de los calores, el sol, la luna y las estrellas, la tierra y el agua; de ella es nuestro origen, alimento y curación.

Consideramos asimismo, que en el territorio de la tribu Yaqui, en el principio de nuestro pueblo, nos consideramos hechos de tierra y agua, en la edificación de nuestra cultura que floreció en las inmediaciones del río “UU JIAME”, hoy conocido como Río Yaqui, que el actual gobierno quiere despojar y matar nuestro origen, nuestra identidad y la vida propia.

Consideramos que a lo largo de 518 años de historia hemos padecido en carne propia y de nuestros corazones la guerra de exterminio de parte de los poderosos. Ante esto, la lucha de nuestros pueblos, naciones y tribus siempre ha sido un principio, la resistencia, y un proyecto histórico, la autonomía, fruto de la resistencia de siglos de este caminar.

Consideramos que la madre tierra y la existencia de la humanidad se encuentra amenazada por el sistema hegemónico capitalista, por su voracidad económica y de explotación de los recursos naturales, de muerte de los ecosistemas por las grandes empresas transnacionales que llegan a despojarnos junto a la corrupción de las instituciones gubernamentales y de políticas de libre mercado como el Tratado de Libre Comercio, el Plan Puebla-Panamá en sus proyectos del noroeste de la Escalera Náutica ( Mar de Cortés), conocida como la carretera costera, con esa decision del mal gobierno buscan robarse las aguas de la cuenca del río Yaqui, con la clara intención de despojarnos y poner a disposición de las grandes empresas el agua, la vida y el territorio para exterminarnos; y como se a dicho que “ el emperador, el capital ha crecido y ha crecido su ambición y poder de destrucción. Si antes el tesoro era de oro, plata, metales y piedras preciosas; ahora es de agua, aire, bosques, animales, conocimientos, personas…”

Considerando, que únicamente a traves de la unidad de los pueblos indígenas del país entre sí, y con todos aquellos mexicanos y mexicanas que son victimas de explotación, despojo y represión podrá ser posible el respeto de nuestro derechos mas fundamentales .

La Tribu Yaqui junto con la Sociedad Civil del Valle del Yaqui, hemos acordado la defensa de nuestra agua, que el mal gobierno y los ricos nos quieren despojar, porque la tierra, el viento, el agua y el fuego son elementos de nuestro origen de la vida, no se venden y con la vida se defienden. Por lo que convocamos:

A todos los pueblos, naciones, tribus, barrios, colectivos, organizaciones indígenas y no indígenas honestas nacionales e internaciones al Primer Foro en Defensa del Agua, a realizarse los días 20 y 21 de noviembre del 2010, en la Comunidad de la Tribu Yaqui de Vicam, Sonora, México, para compartir la palabra, la experiencia e historias de lucha y hacer acuerdo para seguir defendiendo lo que es nuestro.

Bajo los siguientes temas:

1.- Territorio
2.- Agua
3.- El Ejercicio de la Autonomia
4.- Proyectos del mal gobierno

VIDEO: Television crew, activists, arrested at School of Assassins, Nov 2010

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Lehman Brightman: The Real History of the Occupation of Alcatraz

The Real History of the Occupation of Alcatraz

by Lehman Brightman, founder of United Native Americans



Photo: Harold Patty & Oohosis Wearing UNA "Indian Power" Buttons. Yet, Some People Whom Have Published These Picture's In Books Such as "You Are On Indian Land Alcatraz Island, 1969-1971 Edited By Troy R. Johnson, Seem To Over Look This. . . Why? .. Indian occupiers moments after the removal from Alcatraz Island on June 11, 1971
They are (from left): Harold Patty, a Paiute from Nevada; Oohosis, a Cree from Canada; Peggy Lee Ellenwood, a Sioux from Wolf Point, Montana; Sandy Berger, from Fort Hall, Idah © Ilka Hartmann 2009
http://www.ilkahartmann.com

Lehman Brightman on The Real History of The Alcatraz Take Over 1969-1971

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyntBGEMyho

"History will remember Alcatraz as the first time Indians ever tried to regain their lost land. It's the best thing that has happened since Custer's last stand."

"I had 20 students/members of UNA whom took part in The Alcatraz Take Over."

Lehman Brightman-National President of UNA

A special thanks to all of the UNA members who went on become leaders during the Alcatraz struggle. Jack Forbes, LaNada (Means) Boyer, Horace Spencer, Beliva Cottier, Muriel Waukazoo, Stella Leach, Carmen Chrisy and many others.
Date: Tue, 6 Oct 2009 16:47:11 -0700
From: lvwarjack@yahoo.com
UNA Co-Founder LaNada Warjack

Dear Lee,

Congratulations to you! It is about time you have been recognized for your work and efforts in the Bay Area and as the first Director of Native American Studies at the University of California. A short recap of events over forty years ago (1966), we first worked with the American Historical Society, Rupert and Jeanette Costo in San Francisco. Later you became the Director of the American Indian Center on 16th Street when the old guard decided they wanted the Indian Center back. Thats when we decided to form our own organization called United Native Americans networking with Dr. Jack Forbes and David Risling Jr. You organized protests against the BIA for dropping off relocatees in the cities with a one way ticket for employment or vocational training. It was our goal to get our people into the universities and colleges to obtain professional educations. We practiced what we preached and were able get into the University of California at Berkeley to further our own education and continued to organize with other students and organizations, thus the Third World Strike at Berkeley and Native American Studies program.

You became our first Director and we continued the War Path, the organizational newsletter to reach a larger audience. Finally, the students from UC Berkeley and San Francisco State took Alcatraz Island to launch a bigger protest against the federal government for their ill treatment against all our people. Without your leadership and great heart for our Native people, we would not have been able to reach thoes amazing accomplishments. It was our ability to work together as a team with Jack Forbes, David Risling, outside Third World students and academic leaders that has created the momemtum to be successful. Personally, I would like to commend you and thank you personally for your input into this overall success and what exists today. Congratulations and maintain a positive stance for your children and future generations to come.

Sincerely,

Dr. LaNada War Jack aka LaNada Means

Video Evidence Showing UNA Members Denis Turner & LaNada War Jack From Day One Of The Alcatraz Take Over


Occupation of Alcatraz Island: Day 1

http://diva.sfsu.edu/bundles/187779

KQED news report from November 20th 1969, featuring views of American Indians relaxing on Alcatraz Island and tourists circling the island in boats. There are a series of interviews with protesters who justify their occupation of the island. UNA Member Dennis Turner replies to a query about the potential threat of federal force being used to evict them by asking: "How can anyone refuse you legal rights to your own property?"

Interviews with American Indians on Alcatraz

http://diva.sfsu.edu/bundles/187781

A KQED news report from Alcatraz featuring the American Indian occupation of the island, on November 24th 1969. Includes interviews with Dennis Turner, Richard Oakes and LaNada Means. Oakes confirms there there is no outbreak of hepatitis amongst the population and Turner states they're determined to remain there for 10 years if necessary, to defend their property rights. When LaNada Means is asked by a reporter if their protest has any connection with the Third World Liberation Front she replies: "Well, this is a Native American struggle." She describes the occupation as an attempt to make the federal government honor the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie and claims the failure of Walter Hickel (Secretary of the Interior) to respond to their November 20th proclamation was expected. She also points out that whilst living conditions for the protesters are very basic, this is in fact: "Average for an Indian way of life anyway. Now, I mean today."

Interviews & confrontation with Coastguard at Alcatraz

http://diva.sfsu.edu/bundles/187781

KQED news report from Alcatraz Island on November 26th 1969, featuring interviews with the occupying American Indians and excerpts of everyday life there. There is also an episode by the dock in which a U.S. Coastguard boat intercepts a vessel full of protesters, including a brief scuffle.

Interview on The Occupation & ownership of Alcatraz Island.

http://diva.sfsu.edu/bundles/187793

KPIX news report from December 2nd 1969, featuring a press conference in which Richard Oakes explains to the press that: "Alcatraz offers the insulation necessary for us to develop intellectually." The Federal representative Mr Hammon is seen refusing to accept that American Indians may occupy Alcatraz Island indefinitely and UNA Co-Founder Dr. Jack D. Forbes presents an argument in support of their treaty rights to appropriate surplus federal land.

AIM: Thanksgiving: The 1637 Massacre of 700 Native Peoples

42nd Anniversary of AIM
Schedule:
http://aimwest.info
Broadcast live www.earthcycles.net


ORIGINS OF THANKSGIVING

The year was 1637 ... 700 men, women and children of the Pequot Tribe, gathered for their "Annual Green Corn Dance" in the area that is now known as Groton, Conn. While they were gathered in this place of meeting, they were surrounded and attacked by mercenaries of the English and Dutch. The Indians were ordered from the building and as they came forth, they were shot down. The rest were burned alive in the building. The next day, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony declared : "A day of Thanksgiving, thanking God that they had eliminated over 700 men, women and children. For the next 100 years, every "Thanksgiving Day" ordained by a Governor or President was to honor that victory, thanking God that the battle had been won. Newell based his research on studies of Holland Documents and the 13 volume Colonial Documentary History, both thick sets of letters and reports from colonial officials to their superiors and the king in England, and the private papers of Sir William Johnson, British Indian agent for the New York colony for 30 years in the mid-1600s. "My research is authentic because it is documentary," Newell said. "You can't get anything more accurate than that because it is first hand. It is not hearsay." Newell said the next 100 Thanksgivings commemorated the killing of the Indians at what is now Groton, Connecticut [home of a nuclear submarine base] rather than a celebration with them. He said the image of Indians and Pilgrims sitting around a large table to celebrate Thanksgiving Day was "fictitious" although Indians did share food with the first settlers.


Source: Documents of Holland, 13 Volume Colonial Documentary. History, letters and reports from colonial officials to their superiors and the King in England and the private papers of Sir William Johnson, Britsh Indian agent for the New York colony for 30 years. Researched by William B. Newell (Penobscot Tribe) Former Chairman of the University of Connecticut Anthropology Department.

Friday, November 19, 2010

Straightjacket: Navajo president completes water rights coup


Navajo Water Rights Groups Respond to President’s Water Settlement Signoff
By Dine Water Rights
Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley, Jr., has signed the Northeastern Arizona Water Rights Settlement, now making complete the coup, or outside takeover, of the three branches of our government. That settlement minimizes our rights, constrains us like a straightjacket, and puts us farther on the road to complete suppression.
“Great nations like great men should keep their word.” This famous sentence was written by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, in his dissent in the 1960 case of Federal Power Commission v. Tuscarora Indian Nation. He was distressed that the majority of the Court betrayed both the Tuscarora’s trust and the honor of the United States by allowing the violation of treaties with the Tribe and the flooding of their reservation. That is how we feel today; distressed and violated by our own Council and President, who have dishonored the People’s trust and the oaths they took to uphold the promises of our Treaties.
Like tribes of old, our government has been infiltrated by representatives of outside interests who completely control the information received and decisions made by our central government leaders, while, at the same times, excluding the People from access to their own government. Worst among these infiltrators is long-time water lawyer Stanley Pollack. (You can “google” the 2008 article “Navajo Water Rights: Truths and Betrayals” for some of the deceptions, falsehoods, misrepresentations, etc., Pollack has perpetrated against our People) This kind of thing is not new to tribes in modern times. For example, our neighboring tribes, the Hopis, were, for decades, duped and subverted by their late and mistakenly trusted lawyer, John Boyden, who secretly sold them out to corporate and state interests. They were able to confirm this only after his death. (See the book “Fire on the Plateau” by renowned federal Indian law professor Charles Wilkinson.)
While state and corporate interests refer to Stanley Pollack as the best lawyer they ever had, our naïve, deceived, and self-interested leaders, the majority of whom are now under criminal indictment for misappropriation of funds, merrily follow his every whim—like domesticated animals down to the watering hole.
We are reminded of two great Indian country leaders of the Lakota People, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, who were betrayed and slain by members of their own tribe who conspired with government agents. That kind of betrayal is what has happened to us, from our Council and President, as orchestrated by Pollack and his henchmen and women.
It is now left solely up to the Navajo People to try and dig ourselves out of this quagmire of treachery, disloyalty, and internal abuse that President Shirley and the Council have aided outside interests with--in oppressing the Navajo people. This is one of the saddest chapters in our history. To the 51 council delegates and President Shirley, your legacy will be forever remembered as the ones who gave up our precious water rights to outsiders, in 2010.
As advocates for our people, we will also exercise our Treaty rights, which are the People’s, in our fight to reverse this injustice and to put into motion steps to banish this bad man, Pollack, from our Reservation.

Submitted by members of Dine’ Waters Rights
Contact information:
Kim Smith, 505-573-8171, missindigenous@gmail.com
Ronald Milford, 928-606-0787, haskan1990@yahoo.com
Adella Begaye, 928-349-0381, alleda.kay@gmail.com

http://www.dinewaterrights.org/ Water is Life! Protect our Future!

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Rodriguez: Hate, Censorship and against Forbidden Curricula

Supporting the Dec 2-4 Arizona Conference
Combating Hate, Censorship, and against Forbidden Curricula

We are just a couple of weeks away from our Dec 2-4 conference that will address the issues of Hate, Censorship and Forbidden Curricula in the state of Arizona.

The recent elections have only intensified the crisis and siege we’ve been living the past four years. Jan Brewer was elected governor, riding primarily on the wave of anti-Mexican sentiment prevalent in Arizona. State Sen. Russell Pearce – the author of Arizona’s new racial profiling measure, SB 1070 is now majority leader of the state Senate. He has vowed to introduce legislation that will nullify the 14th amendment or birthright citizenship for the children whose parents cannot prove their right to be in the country. State school superintendent Tom Horne – the architect of HB 2281, which seeks to ban ethnic studies in Arizona’s K -12 schools – was elected the state’s attorney general, where he can do worse damage there. His successor, state senator John Huppenthal, has vowed to carry on Horne’s fight at the university level. And the Ward Connerly-initiated anti-affirmative action Proposition 107, under the guise of a civil rights initiative, passed. And of course, Sheriff Joe Arpaio continues with his media-seeking raids, while deaths and militarization along the border continue unabated.

This conference will highlight the heroic response by our community. This resistance has resulted in several arrests (while there have been several acquittals, the trials of 8 defendants are still pending). Separately, 10 teachers and the director of Raza Studies in Tucson have sued the state. For info re this historic lawsuit, filed by attorney Richard Martinez can be found at: http://www.saveethnicstudies.org/

You are invited to attend our conference, which will primarily be a series of dialogues amongst our community, conscious that Arizona is but a lab experiment for the rest of the nation. It will also end with a floricanto, something for our spirits. For info re the prelim conference schedule, for columns related to this crisis and for info re supporting the conference, please go to: http://drcintli.blogspot.com


Thanks & Sincerely
Roberto Dr. Cintli Rodriguez
Professor, University of Arizona
Mexican American Studies
520-626-0824
rodrigu7@email.arizona.edu

KIVA CLUB Talking Circle, Albuquerque, Nov 20, 2010


Contact: Larry Emerson 505 368 3904

UNM KIVA CLUB ALUMNI AND PRESENT DAY KIVA CLUB MEMBERS SCHEDULED TO MEET IN TALKING CIRCLE GATHERING

Albuquerque. A November 20 “talking circle gathering” has been organized by 1970s former and present University of New Mexico Kiva Club members in an effort to share personal and collective stories and journeys regarding situations Native people face today.
The gathering is a joint effort of the UNM Kiva Club alumni and the present day Kiva Club and their president Stephanie Salazaar and is meant to create an opportunity for intergenerational dialogue and conversation.
“The present day Kiva Club might not necessarily understand the deep rooted activism of the 1970s. There is likely a gap of knowledge and experience between our generations. Younger students need to expand their understanding of the past and how present day Indian country is impacted”, according to Kiva Club alumni John Redhouse.
Issues of the 1970s and 1980s involved anti-racism and exploitation of Native people, Indigenous rights relating to land, culture, language, environment, and identity, the need for tribal sovereignty and self-determination, the need to recover Native traditional knowledge, and adherence to historic treaty, hunting and fishing rights. Protests included the Larry Casuse and Robert Nakaidinae incident, the American Indian Movement, the 1970 Alcatraz takeover, the 1972 BIA takeover, the 1973 Wounded Knee takeover, the Longest Walks of 1978 and 1980, the protests at Big Mountain on the Diné Nation, and various anti-racism, anti-exploitation and anti-commodification protests in Farmington, Albuquerque, Gallup and Flagstaff, Az.
“During those times we understood the Kiva Club community to extend beyond the university campus. We were connected to area tribal nations or the original inhabitants of the land, by the need for justice, by the need for understanding and harmony among all of us” said Joy Harjo, Mvskoke,(Creek) Nation, former Kiva Club member.
The gathering is set for November 20, 2010 at the University of New Mexico Student Union Ballroom C in Albuquerque.
The first UNM-Albuquerque Kiva Club Reunion has been a long time coming and many people, especially Larry Emerson and Eulynda Toledo-Benalli, have worked diligently on this event.

The reunion is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. at UNM Student Union Ballroom C.
More ...
According to the planning group, the reunion facilitators will be award-winning journalist Marley Shebala and videographer, KUNM 89.1 FM Singing Wire broadcaster, and NAMPro co-founder Francis "FM" Montoya.

Opening remarks will be made by longtime Indian rights activist John Redhouse and Marley Shebala. Redhouse's involvement with Indian rights and civil rights organization that included Indians Against Exploitation in Gallup, N.M., the Coalition for Navajo Liberation in Farmington, N.M., the National Indian Youth Council in Albuquerque, and the New Mexico U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Shebala's 28 years of journalism experience earned her the name of muck-raker by High Country News for her coverage of the Navajo Nation government. But she takes pride in receiving Community Journalist of the Year from the Arizona Newspaper Association in 2005 and 2008 and the Richard LaCourse Investigative Reporting Award from the Native American Journalists Association in 2002 and 2009.

Internationally acclaimed author, poet, musician and screenwriter Joy Harjo, Muskogee-Creek, will headline and lead other Kiva Club poets in a poetry reading. Harjo's poetry has received a Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Award, the New Mexico Govenor's Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. She has also released three award-winning CD's: Letter from the End of the Twentieth Century, Native Joy for Real, and She Had Some Horses.

Larry Emerson, who describes himself as a farmer, artist, educator and activist from Tse'Daa'Kaan, will be doing a reading on his writings and also provide handouts. Larry received his doctorate in educational philosophy from San Diego State University and Clairmont Graduate University where he conducted research and taught on indigenous decolonization theories and practices.

Toledo-Benalli, who holds a doctorate in education, is conducting research and documentation for the Boarding School Healing Project. "The Boarding School Healing Project has designed October 6 as a day of remembrance. Oct. 6, 1879 was the day Gen. Richard Pratt took children from all Nations and opened the boarding schools in Carlisle, Penn. Many children died." Toledo-Benalli is also the founder of First Nations North & South and an award-winning broadcast journalist.

Copwatch: Guerrero, Indigenous Policing (Espanol)

Policia Comunitaria de Guerrero, an indigenous way of policing the community. This model could be duplicated to various parts of the world.
www.policiacomunitaria.org
Here is a documentary of the story of the police communities of Guerrero: Cuando la Justicia Se Hace Pueblo.

pt. 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9u-Dn3TQpc&feature=related

pt. 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlK6cy1xdsc&feature=related

pt. 3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEt6hV0it1c&feature=related

Shellmound Peace Walk Nov. 2010

Sacred Site/Shellmound Peace Walk
Sponsored by
Indian People Organizing for Change,(IPOC),Shellmound Peace Walkers, SSP&RIT and Foot Prints for Peace
November 17-26, 2010

Beginning in San Jose,CA traveling through the Bay Area to Sogorea-Te` Shellmound -Glen Cove Vallejo, ending at the Emeryville Huchiun Shellmound (Bay Street Mall)

IPOC Shellmound Peace Walkers along with SSP&RIT and Foot Prints for Peace invites all to join in a journey of walk and prayer to remember our ancestors that lived on this land for thousands of years. The walk will be led by traditional Native American leaders and Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhist. We will walk and pray with our ancestors in areas where shellmounds and sacred sites have been desecrated by development and celebrate the return of our ancestors due to the NAGPRA law recent changes.

For More information contact:
Corrina Gould at 510-575-8408
Johnella LaRose at 510-743-7373
or email at shellmoundwalk@yahoo.com, or check our website at
http://IPOCshellmoundwalk.intuitwebsites.com

Foot Prints for Peace is a non-profit, all donations are appreciated and tax-deductible

No Alcohol or Drugs
This is a Citizens Assembly
Date: Leave:

Nov 17 Alviso to Mission San Jose

Nov 18 Mission San Jose to Coyote Hills and Union City

Nov 19 Union City to Hayward and San Leandro

Nov 20 Alameda to Oakland to Berkeley Shellmound

Nov 21 Berkeley Shellmound to UCB /Evening at Thangs Taken – La Pena www.arielluckey.com

Nov 22 Berkeley to Albany Hill to El Cerrito to Point Molate

Nov 23 Point Richmond to Vallejo
Nov 24 Vallejo to Sogorea-te` Shellmound-Glen Cove
Nov 25 East Petlunuc-

Nov 26 Huchiun Shellmound - Emeryville

Fri, Nov 19, 12-9 pm, Event and opening for “We Are Still Here” :
http://www.sfsustudentcenter.com/entertainment/artgallery.php
WE ARE STILL HERE
Running Dates: November 19 − December 18, 2010
Exhibit Opening and Reception: Friday, November 19, 2010

In 2009, a group of SFSU students, in collaboration with native leaders, faculty from San Francisco State University and students from California State University East Bay conducted interviews of historians, native scholars and activists and documented the 40th anniversary of the historic 19 month American Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island. The multi-media exhibit contains photographs, an audio landscape, a collage of contemporary and archival footage; and original art.



12:00 p.m. Art Gallery
Exhibit opens with a blessing by Ann Marie Sayers (Mutsun Ohlone), honor song by Dr. John-Carlos Perea (Mescalero Apache) special guests and student exhibitors
2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Jack Adams Hall
Richard Oakes Celebration with special guests, panel discussion and cultural performances
6:00 p.m. Jack Adams Hall
Cultural program, MC L. Frank Manriquez (Tongva/Ajachmem), Morning Star Gali (Achumawi band of the Pit River Nation) International Indian Treaty Council with Pomo Dancers, Jeremy Goodfeather (Mohawk), and Ras K’dee (Afro/Pomo) of SNAG Magazine, Hoop Dancer Eddie Madril (Yaqui) and All Nations Drum.
7:30 p.m. Jack Adams Hall
Film program Alcatraz is Not an Island presented by James Fortier (Metis/Ojibwe) – a benefit for Fawn and Elijah Oakes (Kashia Pomo and Mohawk)



Sponsors & Supporters:
Center for Sustainable Communities;
Cesar Chavez Institute, SFSU;
Department of American Indian Studies, SFSU;
Department of Ethnic Studies, CSU East Bay;
International Indian Treaty Council;
Richard Oakes Multi-Cultural Center;
SKINS;
The Cultural Conservancy;
and private donors.
Photograph by: Salvador Sanchez-Strawbridge
For more information contact:
Phil Klasky:
pklasky@sfsu.edu
(415) 338-6806









November 22-26, AIM-WEST hosts AIM 42 anniversary in San Francisco


Hosted by AIM West:
42nd Anniversary of AIM
West Coast Conference
November 22nd – 26th

Webcast by: www.earthcycles.netMonday, November 22nd 10:00AM – 6:00PM
San Francisco City College, Mission Campus 1125 Valencia Street *
10:00am Welcoming Ceremony
Introduction; and theme, Climate Change, Land and Self-Determination. Special Guests speakers: Clyde Bellecourt and Yvonne Swann.
10:30am Press Conference – Light Breakfast
11:00am Panel on regional reports; and state of the nation.
12:00pm Lunch (provided by H.O.M.E.Y.) Short film on AIM.
1:00pm Panel on Treaties and Agreements
Ratified and unratified; Federally Recognized, Unrecognized/Disenrollment
2:45pm Break
3:00pm Panel on Health issues,
Diabetes, obesity; (Film ) “Food Security and Sustainability” and MLPA
5:00pm Panel Status on Implementation of “UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”
Solidarity with International relationships & UN activities
*location subject to change check website: www.aimwest.info
Tuesday, November 23rd, 10:00AM – 6:00PM
Again at Mission Campus 1125 Valencia Street*
10:15am Panel on freedom of religion, sacred sites, Bloody Island, NAGPRA
Mineral Resources and Mining Extraction-Mother Earth under attack
12:00pm Lunch. Film: “Poison Wind”
1:20pm Panel on migration/immigration and border issues
Prisoner rights and strategy for Leonard Peltier’ Executive Clemency
2:45pm Break
3:00pm AIM women support network
Leadership and panel discussion led by Yvonne Swan and with Corine Fairbanks; General discussion, open for comments
4:00pm Providing basic support
Building AIM chapters/affiliates/defining role of support groups
5:00pm Discussion on & revisit position on electoral, registration and voting process.
Wednesday, November 24th, 10:00AM – 6:00PM
Bahai Center, 170 Valencia, SF (near 16th BART Station*
10:00am Preparations
Volunteers for turkey dinner are welcome, cooked turkeys being prepared, arrangement of kitchen
12:00pm CEREMONY & FEAST
Beginning of a special program. “”The Eagle invites the Condor”. With 2012 Mayan prophesy and solidarity speaker. Special invited guest Clyde Bellecourt, National Speaker , and drummers and singers, with dance & musical performances.
1:45pm “Unthanksgiving” Potluck dinner & Film “Reclaiming Their Voices: The Native American Vote in New Mexico & Beyond” Plus Q&A
5:00pm Panel on cultural and spiritual and youth development. Institutional racism and mascots.


International Indian Treaty Council and
American Indian Contemporary Arts present:

Indigenous Peoples Thanksgiving

Annual Sunrise Gathering on Alcatraz Island
November 25th 2010

“Giving Thanks to the Creator and Mother Earth for our Survival
and Spirit of Resistance; Dedicated to our Ancestors, Sacred Places and Future Generations”

With guest speakers, Drummers, Aztec and Pomo Dancers, Maori Haka, Jeremy Goodfeather and other special presenters;
MC Lakota Harden


Boats depart from Fishermanʼs Wharf, Pier #33, San Francisco
Tickets: $14 adult, children under 5 free. Ticket booth opens at 4:15 a.m., Boats begin departure from Pier 33 at 4:45 and continue thereafter every 15 minutes until 6:00 AM All return by 9 a.m. Wheel chair accessible and all are welcome to attend.
Purchase advance tickets at

http://www.alcatrazcruises.com/website/pprog-upcoming-events.aspx

or call (415) 981-7625.

This event will be broadcast live on 94.1 FM KPFA (and KPFA.org) from 6-8 AM.
Please respect that NO SALES WILL BE PERMITTED on the Island or the Alcatraz Cruises dock and parking lot.

For more information contact IITC Information office at 415-641-4482 or email Morningstar@treatycouncil.org.

Monday, November 15, 2010

Nature has no price: Climate Change


Declaration ALBA-TCP “Nature has no price”

Declaration of the Ministerial Committee for the Defense of Nature of ALBA-TCP

NATURE HAS NO PRICE

Ministers, Authorities of the Ministerial Committee for the Defense of Nature of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Republic of Cuba, Republic of Ecuador, Republic of Nicaragua, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, members of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Americas – Treaty of Commerce of the People (ALBA-TCP), gathered in the city of La Paz in the Plurinational State of Bolivia, from November 3rd to 5th, 2010.
Considering that:

1. There is within the United Nations is a push to promote the concept of a “green economy” or a “Global Green New Deal” in order to extend capitalism in the economic, social and environmental arenas, in which nature is seen as “capital” for producing tradable environmental goods and services that should then be valued in monetary terms and assigned a price so that they can be commercialized with the purpose of obtaining profits.

2. Studies are being carried out and manipulated, such as the Stern Report on the Economics of Climate Change and the study on the Economy of Ecosystems and Biodiversity, among others, in order to promote the privatization and the mercantilization of nature through the development of markets for environmental services, among other instruments.

3. Those who promote this new form of privatization and mercantilization of nature wish to develop a new kind of property rights which are not exercised over a natural resource in itself, but rather, over the functions offered by particular ecosystems, thus opening up the possibility of commercializing them in the market through certificates, bonds, credits, etc.

4. Under this capitalist conception that seeks only to guarantee benefit for those few who wield economic power: water should be privatized and distributed only to those that can afford to pay for it, forests are only good for capturing emissions and for selling on the carbon market that allows rich countries to avoid reducing emissions within their own territories, and genetic resources must be appropriated and patented for the enjoyment of those who possess modern technology.

Recognizing that:

The right to safe drinking water and sanitation is a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life, which has been endorsed by the United Nations and can only be guaranteed through the recognition and defense of the rights of Mother Earth.

Convinced that:

States are responsible for guaranteeing the sovereignty of the peoples over their natural patrimony and natural resources.

We declare:

1. That nature is our home and is the system of which we form a part, and that therefore it has infinite value, but does not have a price and is not for sale.

2. Our commitment to preventing capitalism from continuing to expand in the spheres that are essential to life and nature, being that this is one of the greatest challenges confronting humanity.

3. Our absolute rejection of the privatization, monetization and mercantilization of nature, for it leads to a greater imbalance in the environment and goes against our ethical principles.

4. Our condemnation of unsustainable models of economic growth that are created at the expense of our resources and the sovereignty of our peoples.

5. Only a humanity that is conscious of its present and future responsibilities, and states with the political will to carry out their role, can change the course of history and restore equilibrium in nature and life as a whole.

6. That instead of promoting the privatization of goods and services that come from nature, it is essential to recognize that these have a collective character, and, as such, should be conserved as public goods, respecting the sovereignty of states.

7. It is not the invisible hand of the market that will allow for the recuperation of equilibrium on Mother Earth. Only with the conscious intervention of state and society through policies, public regulations, and the strengthening of public services can the equilibrium of nature be restored.

8. Cancun cannot be another Copenhagen; we hope that accords will be reached in which developed countries truly act according to the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, and effectively assume their obligation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, without making climate change into a business through the promotion and creation of carbon market mechanisms.

9. That, committed to life, the countries present at this meeting agree to include in our permanent agenda, among other actions, the realization of a referendum on climate change and the promotion of the participation of the peoples of the world.

10. That it is urgent to adopt at the United Nations a Universal Declaration on the Rights of Mother Earth.

Leonard Peltier Family Accuses US of Medical Neglect


Contact: Delaney Bruce, Legal Team Liaison, Leonard Peltier Defense
Offense Committee, PO Box 7488, Fargo, ND 58106, USA; Telephone:
1-701-235-2206;
contact@whoisleonardpeltier.info

Peltier family accuses U.S. government of medical neglect
By Leonard Peltier Defense Offense Committee
"A man dies from prostate cancer every 16 minutes in this country. Why
does my brother have to wait over a year to receive even a diagnosis?"

Native American activist Leonard Peltier, who maintains his innocence,
was wrongfully convicted in connection with the shooting deaths of two
agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1977. Imprisoned for
35 years-currently at the federal prison in Lewisburg,
Pennsylvania-Peltier has been designated a political prisoner by Amnesty
International. Nelson Mandela, Desmond Tutu, 55 Members of Congress and
others-including a judge who sat as a member of the court in two of
Peltier's appeals-have all called for his immediate release. Widely
recognized for his humanitarian works and a six-time Nobel Prize
nominee, Peltier also is an accomplished author and painter.

Sister Betty Solano says Peltier began exhibiting symptoms commonly
attributed to prostate cancer over a year ago. His age (he is 66 years
old) and family history are risk factors for the disease. Pressured by
Peltier's attorneys, the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) ran standard blood
tests in June. Peltier received the results last week, over four months
later. A physician only now says a biopsy is needed to make a
diagnosis.

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the United States. Medical
experts agree that the cure rate for prostate cancer is high, but only
if detected early.

Even if Peltier doesn't have cancer, the symptoms indicate a serious
medical condition and one that could lead to serious complications if
left untreated.

A physician who conducted an independent review of Peltier's medical
records in 2000 concluded that Peltier's overall medical treatment is
below a reasonable standard of care. Decades ago, Peltier suffered a
stroke which left him nearly blind in one eye-damage physicians say
could have been prevented had he been treated sooner. In the 1990s,
there was international outrage after the BOP botched surgeries to
correct a jaw problem. Only then was Peltier transferred to the Mayo
Clinic in Minnesota for treatment. Subsequent procedures were
recommended by a specialist, but never performed by the BOP.

"Last week, at the United Nations, the United States claimed that it is
unequivocally committed to the humane treatment of all individuals in
detention, including criminal detention. Delaying tests, avoiding a
diagnosis, and preventing proper medical treatment for a potentially
life threatening disease is not humane by anyone's definition," a
spokesperson for the Leonard Peltier Defense Offense Committee said.

"Unfortunately, this situation isn't unique to Mr. Peltier. Many U.S.
prisoners die prematurely because treatment is delayed or denied."

Family members want the government to release Peltier who was denied
parole in 2009. His North Dakota tribe has twice passed a resolution
asking the government to transfer Peltier into their custody. Peltier's
many supporters believe his release from prison is the only way Peltier
will receive humane treatment.

###

US Versus Leonard Peltier: Evidence of a Wrongful Conviction. From the
files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation:
http://www.whoisleonardpeltier.info/download/CriticalFBIDocs.pdf.


Contact:

LPDOC - PO Box 7488 - Fargo, ND 58106
(701) 235-2206 (Phone); (701) 235-5045 (Fax)
www.whoisleonardpeltier.info
contact@whoisleonardpeltier.info

Brazil film fest seeks Native entries on uranium

www.uraniumfilmfestival.org


Call for Entries - Uranium Film Festival 2011 in Rio de Janeiro
The 1st International Uranium Film Festival - URÂNIO EM MOVI(E)MENTO - has announced its “call for entries” to filmmakers and film directors from around the world. The festival will held in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo 21st - 28th May and 2nd - 9th June 2011. URÂNIO EM MOVI(E)MENTO is Latin America´s first film festival to highlight nuclear and radioactive issues. It is an annual event with 2 international competitions.
The Festival accepts all independent short films (15 - 40 Min) and feature films (41 - 120 Min) about the whole nuclear fuel cycle. The films (shorts, features, documentaries, movies) could be about nuclear energy in general, about nuclear waste or about uranium prospecting, uranium exploration, uranium mining, or about nuclear transport, about nuclear and radioactive dangers or about people and environment affected by nuclear projects or radioactive elements in general. Movies, videos, films of all production dates are accepted. Film makers and film directors should send entries with the completed application form. Preview DVD must arrive until January 20th 2011. For further information and to download the application form visit our website: www.uraniumfilmfestival.org, or send an Email to info@uraniumfilmfestival.org.There are no Submission fees. Deadline: DVD must arrive until January 20th 2011.
Send Entry Form and DVD with your film to
URÂNIO EM MOVI(E)MENTO
c/o Márcia Gomes de Oliveira
Rua Monte Alegre 356 - Apt. 301
Rio de Janeiro / RJ
CEP-20240-19
Brazil

Email: info@uraniumfilmfestival.org
www.uraniumfilmfestival.org

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Forgotten People to Navajo President: VETO! Aboriginal water rights not for sale

Scanned signed copy of a Lis Pendens Forgotten People filed in Apache County Clerk and Recorders Office, a Notice to the President and a news release.
11/10/10
NAVAJO PROPERTY HOLDERS PUT WATER RIGHTS CLAIMANTS, THE NAVAJO NATION COUNCIL, AND THE PRESIDENT OF THE NAVAJO NATION ON NOTICE ABOUT WATER RIGHTS

By Forgotten People
November 8, 2010-The Forgotten People, a Navajo grassroots organization, on its own behalf and that of Navajo holders of various water rights, including but not limited to allottees, who hold preexisting aboriginal rights, allotment rights, original Indian title allotment rights, restricted allotment rights, public domain allotment rights, homestead allotment rights, and/or other rights, including federal reserved rights, to the waters of the Little Colorado River system and its tributaries, and to the Lower Basin of the Colorado River, and its tributaries, and such rights have not been extinguished; and there are such holders of rights to such waters under other legal theories or regimes; that the purported settlement of Navajo Nation water rights adopted by the Navajo Nation Council is invalid. The Council acted on November 4, 2010.

It is invalid for the reason that the holders of aboriginal, Treaty, homestead, allotment, and other water rights were not given adequate notice of the settlement and that their free prior and informed consent was not obtained by the Navajo Nation.

The Forgotten People organization is filing a Lis Pendens notice with the Apache County Clerk and Recorder on November 8, 2010 to put the world on notice of their property and water rights, and a notice is being sent to President Shirley of the Navajo Nation. The notice requests that he veto the Council action and, if passed, that he refuse to sign the agreement under the discretionary authority granted in the resolution.

Please refer to the attached copies of the Lis Pendens and Notice to President Shirley for more details.

For more information, please contact:

Don Yellowman, President
The Forgotten People
(928) 401-1777
info@forgottennavajopeople.org
www.forgottennavajopeople.org
Document filed with Apache County, download or print at:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/41923434/Forgotten-People-Navajos-Notice-to-President-on-water-rights

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About Censored News


Censored News is published by censored journalist Brenda Norrell. A journalist for 27 years, Brenda lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, writing for Navajo Times, AP, USA Today, Lakota Times and other American Indian publications. After being censored and then terminated by Indian Country Today in 2006, she began the Censored Blog to document the most censored issues. She currently serves as human rights editor for the U.N. OBSERVER & International Report at the Hague and contributor to Sri Lanka Guardian, Narco News and CounterPunch. She was cohost of the 5-month Longest Walk Talk Radio across America, with Earthcycles Producer Govinda Dalton in 2008: www.earthcycles.net/
COPYRIGHTS All material is copyrighted by the author or photographer. Please contact each contributor for reprint permission. brendanorrell@gmail.com
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"O FRIEND! In the garden of thy heart plant naught but the rose of love, and from the nightingale of affection and desire loosen not thy hold." --Baha'u'llah, Baha'i Faith